Genevieve Murray

futuremethod.com.au

Future Acts

Materials | Workshop, tour and discussion

Future Acts examines the spatial politics of the travelling stock reserves (TSRs). They contain practical, environmental and cultural resources that are depended upon today as they have been for millennia. We are only now beginning to understand the origins of the TSRs and their relationship to Indigenous trade routes, aboriginal sites of occupation and their significance to biodiversity. We invite you to listen firsthand to the spatial-politics of this land from a local Indigenous perspective with Wiradjuri elders Kevin Williams and Lyn Syme over a campfire damper breakfast. Kevin will give us a tour of TSR55 showing us how to read the landscape for evidence of aboriginal occupation. Lyn will talk about negotiating Native Title and the spatial-politics of land. Lawyer Maeve Parker will introduce us to Native Title, Aboriginal Land Rights, Future Acts and how they play out in this context. This work is part of an ongoing research project commissioned by the New Landscapes Institute, and culminating in an exhibition at Wagga Wagga Gallery opening 5 May 2017.

1. Genevieve Murray, Future Acts, 2017. photo Alex Wisser
1. Genevieve Murray, Future Acts, 2017. photo Alex Wisser
Genevieve Murray's bio:

Future Method is an architecture, design and research studio founded in 2013. Outside traditional architectural practice, the studio collaborated with artist Nat Randall on The Second Woman for NextWave 2016; the performance collective Branch Nebula on the C3 West project, Food Fight; with architects Alvaro Carillo and Carmen Blanco for WATERTOPIA, commissioned by the New Landscapes Institute; with Dutch group FOUNDation Projects, Sydney-based MS4A, and Archival on projects for the Sydney Architecture Festival 2013 and the Venice Architecture Biennale. Upcoming work includes Stream of Consciousness for Adelaide Biennale 2018 and The Long Paddock 2017 for the New Landscapes Institute.

The commons and the travelling stock reserves contain practical, environmental and cultural resources that are depended upon today as they have been for millennia. A long-term research project, The Long Paddock looks at the intricate relationship we already have to the histories present in them and seeks to offer a way of unlocking these places through wayfinding devices, story telling, and mapping. This project steps outside the yard and invites people to participate in the landscape, not as consumer but custodian.

2. Genevieve Murray, Future Acts 2017. photo Alex Wisser
2. Genevieve Murray, Future Acts 2017. photo Alex Wisser