Jason Lujan

www.jasonlujan.com
Cementa Artwork at Birds Hut

Untitled

Materials | Acrylic spraypaint on natural canvas

Painted natural canvas loosely wrapped around a tree trunk. The pattern on the fabric is based on my own Native North American heritage, and is a stand-in for language; it is a black repeating motif against a natural, unbleached cloth. The idea is to indicate how language embodies a specific worldview, and how it can shape our concept of environment.

This work is part of the Cementa Initiative, ‘Correspondence of Imaginary Places’

1. Jason Lujan, untitled, 2017. photo Alex Wisser
1. Jason Lujan, untitled, 2017. photo Alex Wisser
Jason Lujan's bio:

Jason Lujan is originally from Marfa, Texas, and has lived in New York City since 2001. His multi-disciplinary work is invested in normalising contemporary Native American content within the global cultural fabric. Previous exhibitions and performances include the Heard Museum, Phoenix, AZ; the National Museum of the American Indian, NY, NY; the Curibita Biennial in Brazil; Continental de Artes Indígenas Contemporáneas at the Museo Nacional de Culturas Populares, Mexico City and solo installation, Summer Burial, at the Museum of Contemporary Native Art in Santa Fe. In 2014 he co-organised Zines Plus and the World of ABC No Rio at the New York Center for Book Arts.

I believe that artists have the responsibility to be cultural producers and agents of social change; my work is an effort to invest contemporary Native American culture with an international sense of place. Using common materials and products that reference global commodities and exchange, for example, product branding on cardboard packaging, the goal is to evoke dialectic tension between competing visualities and concepts, yet offer multiple readings on cultural assumptions. I have a preference for creating work that is hybridised, creating images reflective of the layering of transcultural experiences.

2. Jason Lujan, untitled, 2017. photo Alex Wisser
2. Jason Lujan, untitled, 2017. photo Alex Wisser