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Nick Breedon

A World Where You Wouldn't Have to Leave | 2024

Fantasy Sword, 2022-2023, Stolen brass love locks' (padlocks), molten and recast by the artist, 170 x 30 x 10cm, Photo courtesy the artist.
Fantasy Sword, 2022-2023, Stolen brass love locks' (padlocks), molten and recast by the artist, 170 x 30 x 10cm, Photo courtesy the artist.
A World Where You Wouldn't Have to Leave. @ Community Hall Forecourt
“A World Where You Wouldn’t Have to Leave” is a sculptural public artwork, which depicts an array of objects, cast in cement. The objects allude to ideas and structures which could create the living conditions in a regional hometown which would have allow a young person a choice in continuing sustainably in their home town or leaving to a capital city. A World Where You Wouldn’t Have to Leave is drawn partially from Nick’s own history of leaving to pursue an arts career and find community. The work imagines the conditions which could have supported staying, including access to fulfilling employment and participation in the arts, financial security, safe and affordable housing, specialised healthcare, community and friendship.

bio:

Nick’s recently exhibited Public Art, a solo exhibition at Firstdraft, the outcome of their MFA research project Utopian Potentialities: Towards Collective Liberation Through Crip, Queer, and Divergent Signifiers in Sculptural Public Art. Previous projects include holographic rainbow installation Monotone Rainbow; solo exhibitions Bongs and Commodores, Alaska Projects (Sydney); A Lot of Luck Bus Projects (Melbourne); Feelings West Space (Melbourne) and Firstdraft (Sydney); Sierpinski Mountain, TCB (Melbourne); and pyrotechnic text installation Let’s Get Metaphysical, commissioned for the 2012 Splendour in the Grass festival. Nick’s work has been shortlisted for a number of prizes and awards including the 64th Blake Prize, the 2015 Darebin Art Prize and the 2015 Wangaratta Contemporary Textiles Prize, and features in the collections of Artbank and City of Melbourne.

statement:

Working on Gadigal land (Sydney) my sculptural practice weaves references from lived experience, pop culture, and art history through meta-narratives of queer and crip intimacy, collective desire and solidarity, and draws on autobiographical experiences of alienation and isolation, and friendship and mutual support. I incorporate a wide array of material processes and making techniques from craft practices, the western canon of sculpture; oil painting, textiles and video to make “magical” objects, frequently with intentional hyperfixation on detail as an earnest demonstration of personal significance.

Materials | cement
Location | Community Hall Forecourt